• Lydia T.

Being a Halfie and the Idea of “Group Identity”・ハーフとしての「グループ・アイデンティティ」に対する考え・作为混血儿与“群体身份”的理念

Updated: Feb 26


I’m half-Chinese, half-white. Where I grew up in Texas, it wasn’t like I was going to find a large group of people “like me” very easily. But for a long time, it wasn’t something I really noticed. My ethnic identity is not something emphasized at home. And among my diverse group of friends, it just felt like: we’re all Americans, so what’s the difference?


College is when I first really started to feel people “stuck to their kind”. And I was fine hanging out in those groups, because even if I “stuck out”, it’s not like I had ever “blended in”. Learning about different cultures is interesting, and I’m glad to know more about things that matter to other people. However, there were definitely times I felt this inherent sense of “being left out”.


There is a loneliness that comes when the rest of the people in your group have a shared identity. They might get a kind of “thrill” when they meet you, someone obviously different. But once the novelty wears off, most settle into the comfortable patterns of interacting with “their people”. When individuals within that group are truly open to getting to know “you”, those relationships can be really wonderful. But groups are often tough.


However, I do understand the other side. I’ve been living in Japan for a few years, and I sometimes find myself first gravitating towards other fluent English speakers, and then to other Westerners. Because you want to be able to talk to people who just... “know” what you’re talking about. And you want to be able to relax.


But it’s not good to always relax. As human beings, we need balance. While I can’t know others’ lives with my limited perspective, I do worry about people staying in their comfort zone. And with globalization, it’s going to become more and more important that we do know how to interact with people very different from ourselves. It may be difficult, but I know from personal experience that it’s worth it. 


~~~~~~~


私はハーフで、中国系と欧米系のミックス。テキサス州の育ちではある私の周りには、ハーフの人はあまりいない。しかし、長い間この事についてあまり気がつかなかった。ハーフであることは家族の中では全然普通で、友達の中であまり話題にならなかった。皆アメリカ人だから、どうでもいいっていう感じだった。


大学時代、私は初めて「人は自分と同じ人種」と行動しがちだと感じた。そして、上手く溶け込む事が出来なく、少し浮くのが当たり前な私は、そのようなグループと一緒に遊んだりする事に抵抗はなかった。違う文化を持つ人と話すのは興味深く、相手がどんな事を重視しているのかが分かるようになったのは本当に良かったと思います。しかし、一人だけ「仲間外れ」のような、孤独感を感じる時は確実にありました。


他のみんなは同じグループの人間だけど、自分だけが違うなら、特別な寂しさを感じると思う。最初は特殊なハーフ(私)に出会い、興奮し、たくさん話したくなるかもしれない。しかし質問を答え終わり、興味がなくなったら、多くの人はすぐ「自分と同じ人種」に戻り、元のパターンに落ち着く。そのグループ内の一人が心から「あなた」を知りたいと思うと、その関係はとても素晴らしいものになる事ができます。しかし、グループだとかなり難しいです。


だけど、私は最近、相手の気持ちが分かるようになった。ここ数年間日本に住んでいて、英語がペラペラな人と関わりたい気持ちになりがちであり、特にアメリカやカナダから来た人と話したくなる。それは、彼らだとあまり説明をしなくても私の話が基本的に「分かる」から楽であり、リラックスをしながら交流がしたいからです。


しかし、いつも楽にするのは良くありません。人間としてバランスが必要です。 私の限られた視点からだと、他人の経験は分からないが、ただ自分の快適な空間にだけとどまる人については心配します。グローバル化に伴い、自分とは全く違う、色々な人々に接する事が必要となる。 難しいかもしれないけど、自分の経験から見れば、すごく価値があると確信しています。


~~~~~~~


我是一半中国人,一半白美国人。我在德克萨斯长大的地区,并不容易找到一大群“像我一样”的人。但在很长一段时间里,这并不是我真正注意到的。我的民族身份在家里不是特别强调的。在我不同的朋友群体中,感觉就像:我们都是美国人,那么有什么区别呢?


大学是我第一次真正开始感觉到人们“固执于同类人”。我在这些团体中闲逛很好,因为即使我“出头”,也不像我曾经“融入”。了解不同的文化很有趣,我很高兴能更多地了解对其他人重要的事情。然而,有时我确实感受到了这种“被排除在外”的内在感觉。


当小组中的其他人具有相同的身份时,就会感觉到孤独。当他们遇到你时,他们可能会有一种 “兴奋”,见到了一个明显不同的人。但是一旦新鲜感消失,大多数人就会停留在与“他们的人”互动的舒适模式。当该群体中的个人真正愿意了解“你”时,这些关系会非常美妙。但团体往往很艰难。


但是,我确实也理解另一面。我在日本生活了几年,有时我发现自己首先会被其他说一口流利的英语的人所吸引,然后又会被其他西方人所吸引。因为你希望能够与那些只是……“听懂”你在说什么的人交谈。并且你希望能够放松。


但总是放松也不好。作为人类,我们需要平衡。虽然我无法以有限的视角了解其他人的生活,但我确实担心人们会停留在他们的舒适区。随着全球化的发展,我们知道如何与我们截然不同的人互动将变得越来越重要。这可能很难,但从我个人经验中知道这是很值得的。